father of the universe

Would a best religion be agnostic-based and be loved because it provides a way to approach the universe to discover what is available to us as humans?

Can the universe be approached? Can an offspring approach its parents? Who are our parents? Are parents dwelling in every living cell and supported by the tools of the universe: electricity, a mass of chemicals, awareness, and creativity?

Does life spring up relentlessly without reason?

Is it probable the universe has no sensing mechanism to lead it to create an interest in any of its life forms? As  analogies, is energy the father of the universe, matter its mother and life its spirit? End of story?

Will no religion or gods be there to punish or reward us when we die? What makes this result as close as one can get to a sure thing?

After we die, what of us will be left to punish or reward? Is the soul a religious invention and used as a magical power wand? Where will all of the thousands of judges come from to pass judgment? (A judge and a heaven and hell for each set of religious beliefs, except for the Buddhists who don’t believe there’s a supreme being.)

Does believing in magical ideas and magical beings make them real? Or is organized religion a sincere and unmentionable hope-fest? Is it one or the other?

Advertisements

the game of life

I’m imagining I’m in my crib slobbering and goo-gooing and in comes the one I love to see, and my mouth opens wide squealing and my legs kicking and hearing sounds and seeing lips moving and smiling, and I’m picked up and the lips kiss my forehead and cheeks and the one I love puts me back down into the crib. I feel so very good as I pull myself up bobbing and weaving to stand in my crib unaided for the first time.

Down the road I came to recognize a sound and decided the sound was referring to me. I became me, the name, the ID: the one who will eventually choose and figure. My body is the one seeing, feeling, smelling, etc. Today I’m guessing I’m an arrangement in a powerful brain inside of a body which has mobility, language, and will. The last one is critical and is my specialty, it’s my duty to choose. And starting out it was easy.

I didn’t know where I came from until I was told by a girl in my Sunday-school class that I came out of my mother’s stomach. And I asked my mother and she said so too.

I went to church three times a week with my mother for years and they taught that I had an eternal soul inside of me, and to be safe for all eternity, I had to believe and trust in Jesus to be saved from terrible punishments that would never stop.

So, I believed and trusted. Yet I still wasn’t totally honest all the time, and I treated others as I would like to be treated but not all of the time. I was caught shoplifting a pocketknife when I was twelve. Knives weren’t kept under glass when I was a kid. This episode in my life turned out to be a good thing.

The important thing is I was and am a normal human being. I, like everyone else, have either a constant flow of language going on inside of me, or I have language coming out of me, or I’m paying attention to language sounds coming from my surroundings.

Our desire to continue this constant gathering in and reeling out of language must be the reason why there’s a hugh market for entertainment. It’s a wonderful thing to have the opportunity to relax and hear and see the best ideas and things going and to read what others are recommending. What a relief it is to be entertained. 

As one matures, one eventually and naturally wonders about the answers to questions like Does my life have a purpose? and Why am I here? Unless your mind has been made up for you. Which is usually the case until one starts to think for one’s self.

However, it’s not likely we carry around from birth a purpose to complete, and it’s more likely a purpose can find us by appealing to us and then convinces us. How so? Purpose can’t talk but situations can pull thoughts out of us. For a long time I’ve thought there’s no special purpose for anyone, and circumstances help to make it so. 

Beyond giving our gifts to the world, what is there? Can we give something to ourselves? Can one explore without becoming religious? The spiritual philosophies of the East appear to be the oldest and best. Excluding Hinduism’s many gods, is there anything else besides Buddhism and Zen Buddhism which comes close to the depth of their spiritual insights?

Are Buddhism’s ideas about personal fulfillment or enlightenment valid? Does communing with one’s being plug one into the universe? Can existing without language   for a while each day eventually bring a realization which completes a human being?

Countless sages in the past agree there’s more to life than a life where one’s identity dominates all of the time. This is because of its ancient position of decider and planner. 

A normal type of life is all we can expect when normality is all we want. The search-for-enlightenment meme is one of the oldest memes existing. 

No search is necessary because the sages agree our wonderful and powerful carriage is the key. Commune with it silently and it will take you home.

Desire will prompt an adventurous baby to climb out of its crib to explore. Does language represent a special crib which naturally, without malice corrals the normal life?

We don’t notice the corral because being occupied with language has always been the case. There’s no expectation of anything more after death except an afterlife. Is the belief in a never ending joyous or torturous afterlife the ring in the nose of the followers of most organized religions?

Are we all dreaming and snoring, and this rumble is the breath of identity: the wonderful and powerful tool of language? 

betting

Since our universe exists and is so large and so complicated, why would anyone claim, “There is no God”?

Could the reason be because there’s an explanation and evidence for the history of the universe, but we don’t know what happened before the Big Bang and probably will never know. So is God hiding behind the BB?

Could there could be thousands of gods looking on and betting against each other as to who will get the most adherents? Yet…

There are a lot of things we can be very confident about, but not be 100% sure of…like There’s no such thing as real magic or fairies in the forrest, and the odds of such statements being true are a very long way from 50/50.

The odds for the statement “real magic does not exist” being true over the statement “real magic does exist” would in my estimation be close to infinite.

And so would it also be close to infinite for the existence of an entity with a human personality who’s keeping detailed records and is all-powerful and all-knowing. What are the chances that the God of all of the stars and galaxies would reveal itself to a wandering tribe in the desert in need of help? It doesn’t sound natural to have your son die eight billion times on the cross to offer salvation to all of the worlds where civilizations have arisen.

Are folks buying insurance they don’t need with their money, time, and obedience by betting they will not really wink out of existence when they finally stop breathing and will be rewarded for their faith by getting to live forever while being loved and giving love in grandeur and glory?

What do these folks have? A traditional lifestyle that can be very satisfying which can come with a smugness and/or thanksgiving for thinking they are a special group of humans chosen by the only true god, before time existed and will exist forever with this god in heaven. For them, their eternal life as already begun.

Are minds kept corralled by a desire to live forever, happily believing magical ideas are real? It has worked for many many generations. Is this the norm for religious promises?

Why is faith so important? Is it because what they are wanting and believing is magical because there is no proof for their supreme being’s existence, and a strong faith helps to keep doubt from constantly barking, and if they don’t keep the faith, they with all other non-believers will be tortured forever.

The basic question religious folks face is…Is there such a thing as real magic? Was there a real burning bush? If so, did lightening strike it or did a god magically make the bush burn and cause Moses to hear actual words which could be heard by another person if they had been present?

Is the desire to be safe the reason we’re so gullible? Is organized religion just one of the big rackets trying to do good, unlike dictatorships, organized crime, etc? Betting wise, is it better to bet with reason rather than promise?

a house built on sand 2

Think of the parable of the person who built his house on sand and another who built his house on rock. Floods came and the house built on sand was washed away and the house built on rock was not.

In this telling the sand represents magical thinking and the rock represents reason and science. The question is which to attach to, or can one use both?

So, what are the odds of an afterlife? It would be scary if the odds were 50/50. Some aggressive sand dwellers say “I’m either right or wrong, so the odds are at least 50% you are going to suffer in hell eternally if you don’t repent and trust God and keep the faith.” Are the odds so high for science and reason having substance and God not having substance it’s not even a contest? A million to one?

Are we naive when we believe any religious claims which include stories of magical acts or places? How does one choose between the tens of thousands of magical religious stories? Religions are claiming “we are the only true religion and the only way into a pleasant life everlasting.

And they are all so sincere! I know, I was a sand dweller. There’re lots and lots of happy folks in organized religion, and there’s also the very attractive built-in social network. It’s a good racket but can be easily abused.

How does one end up believing in magic? As children we usually think to ourselves at one time or another “That doesn’t seem possible, but all these adults think it really happened, and they are right about everything else, so they’re probably right about the miracles too.”

And later, when doubts come, we say to ourselves I’d be crazy to take the chance of being tortured forever.

We need to feel safe because we believe in an afterlife. Thinking…“I have this clear shot at eternal happiness, how could I ever give it up?”

The belief there’s an afterlife produces a powerful vision. How has it been used? Does the bad out weigh the good?

How does one give up the dream of an afterlife? Imagine a person born into a Hindu family in India. And he or she grew up Hindu. Wouldn’t that person sincerely feel only his or her religious ideas are correct and all other scriptures cannot measure up to Hindu scriptures.

As a Hindu, wouldn’t you feel your beliefs are true just as sincerely as a non-Hindu might feel about his or her different religious beliefs?

When one is wrong, isn’t that person sincerely wrong unless he or she is acting? Does this mean billions are sincerely believing in the wrong magical stories. Or, are all stories based on magic being real, false?

we identities

As my body dies, will I evaporate as I loose my ability to think as my brain looses its ability to function? Is this the only non-magical explanation for the ending of our existence?

After death do our bodies merge with earth sooner or later? After death will we exist as a memory then a record and then no more? How will this happen? Usually records which are no longer useful are eventually lost or deleted. Or will records last for ever in a digital world?

Three thousand years from now, records of our present day found by a researcher might be very interesting and entertaining to the machines and hybrids and the surviving humans. The folks alive today might be forgotten or be heroes in the stories of the social revolutions of the ancient ones.

Will we identities always be natural additions created by our own animal? Are we able to merge with our creator, our ride, by becoming silent? If so, what’s in it for us? Can we uncover a sensation of being everything, the feeling of being completely plugged into the universe.

As we know, being alive on the earth is the real deal and we get to be part of it as human animals and as creations of the animals we ride. What does that make me? Am I a unit of self-consciousness organized by my brain as an individual pattern, a pattern of software sporting a name? Am I a walking talking pile of awareness? Is the universe a giant chunk of awareness fashioned by gravity?

***

Thomas Edison said “The chief function of the body is to carry the brain around.”

***

“Our brain…weighs three pounds and has one hundred thousand miles of blood vessels, contains more connections than there are stars in the Milky Way, is the fattest organ in  your body, [What other thing besides this powerful organ could have created each of us?] could it be suffering this very minute without your having a clue.”

— The above quote is from the newly published book by David Perlmutter, MD with Kristin Loberg titled Grain Brain, The Surprising Truth About Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar — Your Brain’s Silent Killers

 

santa versus religious beliefs

Are almost all religions of the world today
in the same category as Santa Claus
because they are based
on beliefs?

Is a good answer
Yes, but Santa has the disadvantage
of eventually being found out, but
with religions the catch is that
you have to die to find out.

Santa says I’ll tell you a secret:
Nobody finds out if there is
or isn’t an afterlife because
there’ll be nothing left of life support
for thoughts or anything else
so there will be no regrets of a missed heaven
or celebrations of not having to go to a hell.

At death will the knowable cease to exist?

We are dubious and ask Santa
How do you know? and Santa says
I know because I die and am
brought to life again and again.

And Santa says, So it’s a tie between an afterlife
and me when it comes to all of the magical
thinking which surrounds us both.

So, the real difference is nobody
has to die to find out the truth about Santa.
Does Santa lose because no one can find out about
religious truth without dying? And Santa says,
Even then, they don’t find out because they are dead
and can’t perceive anything.

So is it a fair fight? How does Santa respond?
He’s so honest about it. He admits he’s lost.
Santa says, For it to be a fair fight the
religions have to prove their beliefs are true
because believing in Santa is fun
but not true.

So Santa says, They can’t prove
their beliefs are true, so it’s a tie.

Santa thinks religious folks dare not
think about magical thinking because it would
aid in destroying their hope and faith.
Santa whispers back, But not their ability to love,
specially the love for children.

Santa admits that believing in him
is truly a belief. What else could he say?

Santa says proving beliefs are facts is
an extremely hard job because
beliefs by definition are
not sureties.

Behind all the fun and commerce,
could this weakness of beliefs be another reason
and lesson for Santa’s, the Easter Bunny’s,
and the Tooth Fairy’s continued existence?